Blogging Sarcasm

{Originally published on Writing Roads}

I’m not sure if there is such a thing, but I’ve decided that today is make up a new word day. Honestly, as a writer, every day is make up a new word day. I feel totally fine with bending, twisting and manipulating the English language (and some others as well). My newest word is ’sarcasticate’ and it means: to make something sarcastic. It’s a verb. I like it so much, I’m writing a whole post about it, and here it is.

Sometimes, I wish I could write code or do computer programming. First of all, it would make me smarter and more able. Secondly, it would help me with an issue that I keep running into.

You see, I can make things bold. I can italicize. I can underline. I can even strikethrough. But, I can’t sarcasticate.

Even using those smiley face emotive icons, there isn’t one that means sarcastic. They have sad, mad, kissey, sick – all of those are easily visible states of being. But sarcastic? Not so much.

It seems that sarcastication, while writing on the internet must actually be conveyed through words. There is no help. And, while I do think it’s safe to say that I have the sarcasticating gene, I also think that the reader has to have that gene too…and some brain power. Not to mention the fact that you must have actual reality downpat before you can get the sarcasm. So, conceivably, my sarcastications could be missed by some readers because of their own ineptitude or because I might be having an off day.

Without the sound of my voice, I rely on my written words…because I’m a writer…that’s the point, I get it. And, I’m thrilled that while code and program can’t currently help me sarcasticate, I can mold my meaning with my words (those that are real and those that I’ve composed).

Editor’s Pick by Kelby Carr of KelbyCarr.com. OK, I simply love this post because I have thought this same thing, struggled with how to “sarcasticate” many times while typing, and never thought to post about it like Julie Roads did. What IS up? Coders? anyone? Can’t we just get a smiley with an eye-roll or something? Plus, as a writer, I adore anyone who has this statement on her About page of her blog: “I’m pleased to shout from the rooftops that I LOVE WHAT I DO. I love to write, I love to learn, I love talking to you, and can’t wait to get into your head, into your business, and then — to write, write, write for you.”

Comment with Facebook

14 Comments to “Blogging Sarcasm”

  1. catnip says:

    I think you and I would get along really really well. And I’m not being sarcastic!

    catnips last blog post..deja snow

  2. Dave says:

    Yes, there should be a sarcasm emoticon, because sarcasm is only entertaining and effective when it is labeled as such. Well maybe not an emoticon, but something.

    My oh so modest proposal is that we use the euro symbol (€) to indicate sarcasm. Right now it’s just a waste of space…why would we ever need to use that character here in America?

  3. Deb
    Twitter:
    says:

    Soooo many times I think my sarcasm is completly clear, but then the recipent of the email or text gives it a straight read. I do the opposite–I assume everything I read is sarcastic until proven otherwise. But I’m just not an emoticon girl, so that won’t help me. And I have no freaking clue how to make that fancey Euro sign, even if I were.

    (Great pick, Julie Roads is Awesome!)

    Debs last blog post..Night-Night Story for Benjamin Button

  4. MommyTime says:

    I struggle with sarcastication all the time — and I do think that it’s a problem of the point where the minds of writer and reader meet: if you both totally “get” each other, chances are you know each other in real life too, so you hear a real tone of voice when you read. My biggest fear is when I write something sarcastic (meant to be funny) in a comment in response to someone else’s post, and then I have commenter’s regret, thinking, “Oh, no, what if she doesn’t GET that that was sarcastic? What if she thinks I was serious and now she HATES me?” I think your call for an eye-rolling emoticon is perfect. (I can’t do the Euro sign either.)

    MommyTimes last blog post..The Richness of Childhood

  5. Dave says:

    Did I fall for the sarcasm in the original post, or did the commenters fall for the sarcasm in my comment? *goes insane*

    In 100% seriousness, sarcasm forces readers to make a decision for themselves as to how clever the author is and whether they believe the stated point is true or not true.

    If you label your sarcasm, you’re lobotomizing the joke for an audience without critical thinking skills. You might still make your point, but it’s not fun anymore, so you might as well just skip the sarcasm and identify it as an attempt to prove your point by proving that the opposite is not true.

    Seriously, someone tell me if Julie is being sarcastic in the OP. If so, I just failed the Internet. :(

  6. Julie Roads says:

    Dave! I can’t help but be sarcastic – so that post has it’s moments – but I meant every word – does that help? I mean, it’s a real issue, but…it’s not of ground-breaking importance.
    Your comments made me laugh…

    Thanks Deb and Mommy Time for your thoughtful comments!!!

    Julie Roadss last blog post..The LOVE ebook: love creations and real support for those hit by the recession

  7. c.a. Marks says:

    That’s why you have to brave it sometimes; letting your readers figure it out. They will. They are smart like that.

  8. c.a. Marks says:

    Um I messed up my website link on the leave a comment form, in the previous comment. It should be good now.

    c.a. Markss last blog post..Well, I Blew It

  9. Mr Lady
    Twitter:
    says:

    “Not to mention the fact that you must have actual reality downpat before you can get the sarcasm.”

    Now THAT cracked me right up. :)

    Mr Ladys last blog post..Reason 872 Why I Should Never Have Told Him I Have a Blog

  10. [...] (another joke.  seriously, when are we getting that sarcasm font?) [...]

  11. Kevin says:

    my friend and I came up with an idea to indicate sarcasm. We begin the sarcastic phrase with / and end it with \.

    For example, /hannity is really liberal\. It doesn’t emphasize words but it indicates that the intent of the phrase is sarcastic, because as we all know, Hannity is anything but liberal.

    /It’s going to be the next big thing.\

  12. prav says:

    If you label your sarcasm, you’re lobotomizing the joke for an audience without critical thinking skills. You might still make your point, but it’s not fun anymore, so you might as well just skip the sarcasm and identify it as an attempt to prove your point by proving that the opposite is not true.

    PRAV

    blogging for a living-blogging for a living

    pravs last blog post..Cash Tips For Making Quality Blogs

  13. prav says:

    Good help by you

    Prav

    blogging for a living-blogging for a living

  14. autodesk downloads,…autodesk software,
    microsoft sql server price
    ms access sql server microsoft sql server 2008 r2
    microsoftsqlserverversions
    microsoft sql server express ms sql server

Leave a Comment

Twitter ID
(ID only. No links or "@" symbols)

CommentLuv badge